Check out the latest video Line for Line from Mi’kmaq MC/Producer Beaatz, of Tobique First Nation in New Brunswick, Canada.

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  • #Indigenous #music #culture #hiphop #Line for Line #Beaatz #New Brunswick #video #Mi'kmaq #Tobique First Nation
  • 1 year ago
  • 6

In October of this year, the small community of Pic River lost four members in a tragic accident. Pic River resident Bonnie Couchie wrote this beautiful and stirring song for those four and her community.

The video also features Bonnie’s daughter Binaeshee-Quae. Of the song’s creation Bonnie wrote “in the week following the accident I sat by one of the sacred fires and wrote a song that I found some comfort in. This song is about the many ways that these young men were here for us as family and friends. It is also about all the ways that they as spirits, and we as physical beings continue to be here for one another in good times and in bad. The phrase “Niin dia maade” was taught to Binaeshee by her late grandpa Lambert Nabigon” and it means I am here.

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  • #Indigenous #music #culture #Pic River #Bonnie Couchie #Binaeshee-Quae #Ojibway #video #loss
  • 1 year ago
  • 2

Bubble Gum is the new irresistibly joyful video from Pamyua.

Bubble Gum is a drumsong off of Pamyua's double album SideA/SideB. The album is a collection of Inuit drumsongs primarily sung in the Yup’ik and Cup’ik language from Southwestern Alaska. Interestingly disc 1 of SideA/SideB features drumsongs performed traditionally with only vocals and drumming where as disc 2features the same songs but with different world music arrangements, offering a new way to enjoy and approach Inuit music.

This playful and infectious video was filmed in Unalakleet by the Anchorage-based film collected Electric Igloo Creative, Bumble Gum was made thanks to a successful Kickstarter campaign. Congrats to everyone involved!

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  • #Indigenous #music #culture #video #Pamyua #Alaska #Yup’ik #Cup’ik #Bubble Gum #drumsong #SideA/SideB
  • 1 year ago
  • 13
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  • #Indigenous #music #culture #A Tribe Called Red #dance #electronic #video #tour
  • 2 years ago
  • 8

thesaratea:

Leela Gilday is amazing. CHECK HER OUT!!

That she is! We <3 Leela! http://rpm.fm/artist/leela-gilday-2/

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  • #Indigenous #Music #Culture #Leela Gilday #video #Dene
  • 2 years ago
  • 7

Kristi Lane Sinclair posted this demo of a brand new song on YouTube this week. We love her raised-on-grunge with a bit of old-country-grit vocals. 

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  • #Indigenous #music #culture #video #Kristi Lane Sinclair
  • 2 years ago
  • 1

The new Thug Mentality video features Wabs Whitebird. Check it:

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  • #Indigenous #Thug Mentality #culture #music #video #Wabs Whitebird
  • 2 years ago

If you know and love Oka, or need a good introduction to the band, watch this!

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  • #Aboriginal #Australia #Indigenous #Oka #culture #music #video
  • 2 years ago
  • 1

VIDEO: Hobiyee 2012 Ts’amiks Edition
by Ron Harris aka Ostwelve

Nisga’a New Year, known as “Hobiyee,” was celebrated in Vancouver at the Agrodome last week and we have some video.

Hobiyee is the new year celebration of the Nisga’a First Nation that celebrates the first crescent moon that is shaped like “hoobix,” which is the the shape of the Nisga’a spoon. This special crescent shaped moon with its bowl facing upwards indicated that the following season would be a bountiful harvest of oolichan, salmon, berries and other resources. From Hobiyee 2012 Ts’amiks Edition, here’s an explanation on the meaning of “Hobiyee”:

The Simgigat-Nisga’a Chieftains in past centuries studied the celestial heavens. They were knowledgeable in the behaviours of the stars in proximity to the moon which forecasted the weather patterns. They studied the astrology not from text books but by years of observing the heavens. The Halayt-Simgigat (Spiritual Leader- Chief) studied the “Buxw-laks” moon, The Moon of February. Over time, they observed that whenever the first crescent moon is in the shape of a “Hoobix”- the bowl of a Nisga’a wooden spoon, thin shaped and the ends pointing upward- that in the following seasons the resources of our lands would be plentiful, the oolichan, salmon, berries and various other resources, bountiful. Hobiyee is about the point in time when our “Gal-ha’ink” Cedar Bent Boxes of the Nisga’a are near empty of their winter provisions and they have begun to ration the last of their provisions. The Nisga’a are hoping and praying for a bountiful season of oolichans (saviour fish) and a fruitful year. So the Nisga’a say, “Hobiyee” meaning “the spoon is full”.

Hobiyee is celebrated with a potlatch filled with traditional song and dance. This year in Vancouver, the Hobiyee celebration was taken to a new level when it was hosted by the Nisga’a Ts’amiks Organization at the PNE Agrodome and streamed live onto the internet. The event included hundreds of drummers, singers and dancers from around British Columbia and lasted 2 nights. Although this event has already passed here in Vancouver, there is an even more traditional event happening in the traditional territory of the Nisga’a in Gitlaxt’aamiks, which is the capital of the Nisga’a Nation 97 kilometers of Terrace, British Columbia. For more info on that event, visit: nnkn.ca/content/hobiyee-2012-feb-24-252012-gitlaxtaamiks-bc-rec-centre. The archived live stream of the Vancouver Hobiyee celebration is some of the best footage capture of the event.

Here is the grand entry.

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  • #Indigenous #music #culture #video #Nisga'a #Hobiyee
  • 2 years ago
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